If you’re getting turned down by traditional insurers due to a spotty driving record, the Texas Automobile Insurance Plan Association (TAIPA) is probably your best option. It only offers the bare minimum required by law, it’s more expensive than traditional insurers, and you’ll have to show proof that you’ve been turned down by at least two companies. It’s a last resort, but TAIPA will get you back on the road.

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Progressive offers a unique discount through a program called Snapshot, a usage-based insurance plan that transmits real driving data to the company. Using a telematic device installed in your vehicle, Snapshot monitors your driving behaviors — such as how rapidly you accelerate or how often you stop abruptly — as well as the miles and times you drive, which can increase your risk of an accident.
I used to have Farmers insurance until I got in an accident. Even though I had a local insurance agent, because I had to file my claim after hours, I had to contact a generic claims call center. Then, since I initiated the claim using the 1-800 number, I had to complete the rest of the process that way. At that point I was asking myself why I was paying a premium to have a local agent when he was doing nothing to help me. After the whole experience, I decided to shop around and ended up choosing Progressive. They had much better prices and since it no longer mattered to me to have a local agent, I signed up. I've had nothing but a positive experience with Progressive so far.
Many insurers state that their policies offer ‘full coverage’ without detailing what that means, because, well, it doesn’t really mean anything. According to Jonathan O’Steen, personal injury attorney and partner at O’Steen & Harrison LLC, “Some insurance agents use ‘full coverage’ as a shorthand way to describe auto policies that only meet state minimum limits for coverage. True full coverage would provide unlimited protection for all losses arising from an automobile accident.”

One of Progressive’s add-on coverages includes a “disappearing deductible” option. This means that each year you don’t file a claim, Progressive will drop your rate by 25%. With this method, the company boasts that you could eventually have a $0 deductible. But it only stays this way as long as you haven’t filed a claim — if you do, your deductible will go right back up. Safeco also incentivizes safe driving with low deductibles. Safeco will reduce your collision deductible by $100 each year you don’t have a claim, but this incentive caps at $500.
There are certainly insurance carriers and policies that will not cover any driver not specifically named in the policy. Other relevant facts include where the “other driver” resides and if they are related to the insured. In general, if someone is living in the insured’s household and regularly drives the insured’s vehicle, many insurance carriers expect you to have that person named on the policy. They will need to undergo the same underwriting and qualification process as any other policyholder.
Saved me $370.00 on a three car policy and have nad no problems with the two claims I had within the last three years. Easy to work with on the phone or on line, you can choose your own repair shop and they will back you if the repairs are not correct. Had State Farm before and they did not have a firm handle on my account. I was recieving notification of changes constantly, $11.00 here and $14.00 there. When I would call to inquire, If I could get through they were never sure or justify why the small changes. They took all my pocket change, will not go back, I found a new home after years at SF.
I just saved about $400 dollars a year by switching to AAA from State Farm. The coverage for my cars is the same and the coverage for my home is much better (and cheaper) than before. I have a credit card through AAA, roadside assistance through AAA and finally, my insurance through AAA. I could not be happier. On all fronts, AAA has the best customer service I've ever encountered.
I LOVE nationwide! I previously had State farm under my parents, and switched onto my own when quoted. I received a call the next week telling me it would be 90 more a month! I called EVERYWHERE and the cheapest I could find was 4000/6 months, until I called nationwide. (I am only 18 with a new car and high coverage. ) My new agent is VERY nice and informative and I am only paying 1200/6months. One week after switching, someone totaled my car, and Nationwide was right there, helping me through everything. I would NEVER switch! Go Nationwide!

I had Allstate for over 20 years and it just kept going up. I would contact my agent to see if anything could be saved and they would adjust it slightly each year, but it was over $200 per month and I had a perfect driving record, and my vehicles were getting older and older. Finally I was fed up and got quotes from nearly a dozen insurers and Esurance beat them all, lowering my payments by more than HALF! Now I'm worried, though, since Allstate has now purchased Esurance. Will my rates start to go up and up again? Time will tell.

Michigan weighs in with the highest RV insurance rates, at a median annual premium of $4,490. Why are the average rates in Michigan so expensive? Because the state has mandatory personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, which results in much higher costs for the insurance companies whenever there is an RV insurance claim. The second highest is Louisiana, with a median annual premium of $2,912.
I love GEICO, they have EXCELLENT customer service! They are always great, they're always so personal, they are always there to help all day and night and weekends and you don't have to worry about someone being on vacation or sick because there's always more and great agents there to help. Plus they work with other outside companies and you can get discounts other places just for being with them. I just wanted to say I think GEICO is worth calling and getting a quote if you don't already have a policy.
Now as to Hartford, I have had them for years and claims for uninured motorist on my car ins and for storm damage on my roof due to large hail. Both claims settled satisfactorily. Cost to the company will never be recovered thru cost of my policies. Also policy cost is in line with other large companies but defiantly not cheap. I just received a quote from Liberty Mutual on my car insurance $400 less that Hartford. However the agent seemed reluctant to send me the quote via email. I thought this strange since I wanted to verify the coverage was he same as I have, he said I just reviewed the coverage (via phone call) to which I replied I didn’t record the conversation so please send me an email detailing the cost and coverage, He stated he would but that was a couple hours age and still haven’ heard back. Go figure.
Progressive impressed us with a solid array of discounts, including deductions for simple things like signing a new policy early and opting for paperless billing. The company has historically been known for insuring "riskier" drivers than many of its competitors, and it shows: Progressive is our only contender that offers a near unheard-of discount for drivers under 18 (who have a crash rate that’s almost nine times higher than that of middle-aged drivers).
If you previously bought an insurance policy for your car and are not sure if you’re still covered, it’s possible that your policy has renewed automatically. Most insurers will send you a renewal notice and automatically renew your cover if you don’t take any action. If you think this might be the case, you can find out by contacting your insurer or checking your bank statements to see if any payments have been collected in the past 12 months.

Several jurisdictions have experimented with a "pay-as-you-drive" insurance plan which utilizes either a tracking device in the vehicle or vehicle diagnostics. This would address issues of uninsured motorists by providing additional options and also charge based on the miles (kilometers) driven, which could theoretically increase the efficiency of the insurance, through streamlined collection.[3]
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