The Road Traffic Act, 1933 requires all drivers of mechanically propelled vehicles in public places to have at least third-party insurance, or to have obtained exemption – generally by depositing a (large) sum of money to the High Court as a guarantee against claims. In 1933, this figure was set at £15,000.[21] The Road Traffic Act, 1961[22] (which is currently in force) repealed the 1933 act but replaced these sections with functionally identical sections.
I love metlife! My brother was driving my car and wrecked it. They were so responsive and proactive. They encouraged him to see a doctor right away, paid all the medical bills promptly, and paid a decent price for my totaled car. They routinely checked up on my brother to make sure he was getting all of the attention he needed. I couldn't believe these guys! THEN my brother hit a building with my truck and did some damage to the building. They again dealt with it promptly and settled with the property owner. They were so available and easy to talk with. They were so nice to me and after these two incidents, they did not raise my rates or anything. Truly, I will never use any other company! I have absolutely nothing negative to say about them.
Nationwide’s coverage options make it easy for part-time RV users with accessorized RVs to get the support they need. Besides basic coverage, Nationwide also insures personal belongings and sound systems. If you’ve tricked out your RV especially for vacation, Nationwide has you covered there, too: It provides roadside assistance, rental reimbursement, emergency expenses, and vacation liability for personal injuries.
Many providers offer discounts as rewards for “good” customer behavior. Common ones include discounts for driving safely, paying your entire annual premium upfront, keeping your RV in storage for part of the year, switching from another provider, holding membership in an RV association, or taking an RV safety course. We noted if a provider listed generous discounts available to all customers. However, many discounts vary depending on location. To see if there are any specific to your area and to compare RV insurance prices, ask an agent.
As we have seen, this is usually not the right question to ask. However, that won’t prevent inquiring minds from asking – over and over. An answer to the question that isn’t going to be universally correct, therefore, is that insurance that follows the car usually has the vehicle listed in the policy. If anyone who has your permission drives the car, that person is probably covered by virtue of the fact that the car is covered. However, as we’ve seen, this kind of insurance does not cover everyone. There are qualifications for the drivers covered. Other types of coverage such as collision or comprehensive insurance will usually follow the car. These coverages will usually not “follow the driver” to any vehicle which the “covered” driver operates.
I just switched from State Farm to Nationwide and State Farm was reasonable, though I wasn't necessarily happy with the coverage. It was only $79 a month for full coverage, but they didn't have accident forgiveness, if I got into an accident, I would have to pay 20% of the rental fee for a car, and the lowest deductible for collision they will go is $250. I switched to Nationwide a week ago and the quote was for $70 a month, (every little bit counts) but the big difference is the coverage. I got accident forgiveness included, also they pay 100% of car rental fee, and I only have $100 deductible for collision. However they do have $0 deductible but 100 I can do. This is for a 2011 Ford Focus which Focuses are generally cheap to insure.
I was with Liberty Mutual for about 15 years and was very satisfied with their prices and service, although I never filed a claim. When I retired and moved from California to Florida, my auto rate went up a ridiculous amount, to almost $10,000 a year even though I had no accidents and one minor moving violation in the last ten years. On top of that, Liberty Mutual screwed up my umbrella policy and told me it was “unenforceable,” whatever that means, but I had to pay for the policy anyway up to the time I canceled and switched to Progressive, which cost about one third the cost of Liberty Mutual for an identical policy. Even good companies change over time.
Progressive offers a unique discount through a program called Snapshot, a usage-based insurance plan that transmits real driving data to the company. Using a telematic device installed in your vehicle, Snapshot monitors your driving behaviors — such as how rapidly you accelerate or how often you stop abruptly — as well as the miles and times you drive, which can increase your risk of an accident.
Driving without the necessary insurance for that vehicle is an offence that can be prosecuted by the police and fines range from 841 to 3,287 euros. Police forces also have the power to seize a vehicle that does not have the necessary insurance in place, until the owner of the vehicle pays a fine and signs a new insurance policy. The same provision is applied when the vehicle is standing on a public road.
One of Progressive’s add-on coverages includes a “disappearing deductible” option. This means that each year you don’t file a claim, Progressive will drop your rate by 25%. With this method, the company boasts that you could eventually have a $0 deductible. But it only stays this way as long as you haven’t filed a claim — if you do, your deductible will go right back up. Safeco also incentivizes safe driving with low deductibles. Safeco will reduce your collision deductible by $100 each year you don’t have a claim, but this incentive caps at $500.

Specialized RV coverage might sound expensive, but its more affordable than you might think. Once you factor in all the available discounts and take advantage of sensible, money-saving coverage features like the Storage Option, you could be saving hundreds over the course of a year. If you’re trying to protect your RV with insurance coverage that’s suited for a car, then you’re putting it at risk.
I had Allstate for over 20 years and it just kept going up. I would contact my agent to see if anything could be saved and they would adjust it slightly each year, but it was over $200 per month and I had a perfect driving record, and my vehicles were getting older and older. Finally I was fed up and got quotes from nearly a dozen insurers and Esurance beat them all, lowering my payments by more than HALF! Now I'm worried, though, since Allstate has now purchased Esurance. Will my rates start to go up and up again? Time will tell.
CTP insurance is compulsory in every state in Australia and is paid as part of vehicle registration. It covers the vehicle owner and any person who drives the vehicle against claims for liability for death or injury to people caused by the fault of the vehicle owner or driver. CTP may include any kind of physical harm, bodily injuries and may cover the cost of all reasonable medical treatment for injuries received in the accident, loss of wages, cost of care services and, in some cases, compensation for pain and suffering. Each state in Australia has a different scheme.
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