Do you live in your RV full-time, or does it sit in storage for most of the year? Do you have any permanent attachments like a satellite dish? Every company offers basic RV coverage, but the right provider for you also offers the set of add-ons that speaks to your main concerns, whether it’s full-time residency insurance or roadside assistance. Our top picks all have plenty of add-ons in addition to basic coverage.

Working with insurance adjusters on a daily basis, I couldn't image carrying insurance through any other company. I find Erie to be the most likely to settle claims, which makes me feel extremely well-covered when I'm on the road. I know that if something happens, and the other person doesn't have insurance, my company will take care of me without pushing back or thinking of dropping me. I love ERIE!.


We first looked for companies that received an "A-" or better (“strong”) from A.M. Best, a rating agency specifically focused on the insurance industry. Then, because the III recommends getting ratings from more than one agency, the best needed to earn at least an "AA-" (“very strong”) from S&P Global or an "Aa3" (“excellent”) or higher from Moody’s.
USAA maintains a strong financial standing and earned a 95/100 from Consumer Reports with Excellent marks all around. This means you won’t have to worry about settling up financially with the company and you’ll likely have a decent time maneuvering through their claims process. If you or anyone in your immediate family is an active or retired service member, you should definitely give USAA a call and get a quote.
Liberty Mutual offers a few hard-to-find discounts, including savings for newly married couples, new graduates, retirees or drivers over 50, and certain drivers under 18. Some of its coverage options are on the rare side, too — like options for mechanical breakdown coverage, vanishing deductibles, or new car replacement that reimburses you for the car’s original worth (rather than its depreciated value). In short: Liberty Mutual has some niche offerings, so it may be worth speaking with an agent about specialized or customizable coverage needs.
Liberty Mutual just dropped my family because of two claims that were made on my daughters car. She had her car at school freshmen year and It was parked and hit on the rear corner closest to the road. It wasn’t her fault and no one came forward to admit to the accident. She no longer has a car at school, and drives rarely when she’s home. The second accident was when she was pulling out of the carport and her front bumper caught a wooden railing when she was backing out. That was her fault, but an accident. Isn’t that why we have insurance????? Before I got this letter from Liberty mutual, I sang their praises. I will loudly have bad things to say from now on. Don’t count on Liberty Mutual
I was tired of my insurance payments going up and up and up, so thought it was time to start shopping for new insurance. I had tried over the Internet before but hadn't a clue what I was doing, so I just gave up. I had my previous insurance elsewhere and came to find out I was paying way, way too much. I am saving $750. 00 a year by switching to Esurance! I could not believe it! I immediately started the process of switching, and I am now a new Esurance customer and a very happy one! Today, I received my policy and cards via email just as promised and am glad I switched!

Beyond the standard protections, supplemental (or “add-on”) coverage will keep you protected against the additional costs that often come with accidents. Features like car rental coverage may not seem essential when you view them as just another added cost, but the increase in your rate could still be lower than the cost of renting a replacement vehicle if your damaged car is in the shop for a while. The options offered by providers vary widely in both availability and cost. Our favorites offer supplemental coverage options that can build a policy for every profile.

TRUCK OWNERS BEWARE! I had Ameriprise for almost 20 years until today. They DOUBLED my rates to $750/6 months when I moved, then required I complete a new application as though I was a new customer. Then, because I made a mistake on the form (I'm old, I make mistakes sometimes), they insisted I provide them titles to the vehicles, one I don't have because it's financed, the other I sent them years ago. So they said to send the registrations, which I did. Next day I get an email saying I have to send the titles again. I called and told them I felt I was being harassed. They said fine, the registrations would work. But, that we needed to discuss the issue of me using my truck to pull a horse trailer. I said I wasn't using my truck to pull a horse trailer, I had only called to inquire whether or not they "insure" horse trailers. What then followed was a debate of almost 15 minutes with them repeatedly saying my policy needs to be reviewed and every time I asked for what, they ...more


Certain factors must be considered in determining if an insured is covered when driving someone else’s vehicle, including the reasons for driving the vehicle, if the insured had permission or not, or if it was a rental or dealership loaner. In each case, the individual circumstances and state law involved will factor into the outcome, but another policy might be considered primary over the insured’s.
In general, insurance coverage for an insured driving someone else’s vehicle is the coverage he carries for his own vehicle. The driver’s personal coverage will apply in most cases when driving a vehicle he does not own. This includes any uninsured motorist coverage he carries and the medical portions of his policy. The driver’s property damage coverage might carry over while driving another’s car as well, depending on the policy language, the respective limits of the two policies involved, and the facts. If a person drives his own vehicle without insurance, he should not expect that he is covered when driving someone else’s vehicle.
A compulsory car insurance scheme was first introduced in the United Kingdom with the Road Traffic Act 1930. This ensured that all vehicle owners and drivers had to be insured for their liability for injury or death to third parties whilst their vehicle was being used on a public road.[1] Germany enacted similar legislation in 1939 called the "Act on the Implementation of Compulsory Insurance for Motor Vehicle Owners."[2]
×